Lecture Notes in Education
Psychology and Public Media

Mindfulness Relationship with People’s Performance on Academic Problems

Author

Stephen Huang 1

1 Lake Forest Academy

Keywords

academic performance, psychology, try/do, mindfulness, cognitive style

Abstract

In this research, the subjects are going to be people who were asked to take an online survey. They were given academic problems to test if thinking mindfully could help someone to perform better than average while dealing with academic problems. For other researches that are about mindfulness, many other important fields were tested such as law fields and designing fields. This research is going to test people on their performance on academic problems, something that was not previously done in other research. After the research, the results showed that people who were given “try” did a little better than those who were given “do”. However, those results are only based on a small scale of people and need further research to make the result more believable.

Citation

Stephen Huang. Mindfulness Relationship with People’s Performance on Academic Problems. LNEP (2021) LNEP ICEIPI 2021: 182-189. DOI: 10.54254/lnep.iceipi.2021194.

References

[1]: Huang, Peter H. “Can Practicing Mindfulness Improve Lawyer Decision-Making, Ethics, and Leadership?” SSRN Electronic Journal, 2017, doi:10.2139/ssrn.2907513.

[2]: Sherman, Mark. Mindfulness as a Skillful Approach to Inclusive Design. 2013, core.ac.uk/download/pdf/54849570.pdf.

[3]: Baginski, Andrew, "Attention Regulation, Emotion Regulation, and Cognitive Flexibility as Mediators of the Relationship Between Mindfulness and Academic Achievement in High School Students" (2015). Masters Theses. 2395. https://thekeep.eiu.edu/theses/2395

[4]: Langer, Ellen, et al. “Believing Is Seeing.” Psychological Science, vol. 21, no. 5, 2010, pp. 661–666., doi:10.1177/0956797610366543.

[5]: BEARANCE, DEB. “Mindfulness in Moments of Crisis.” The Journal of Educational Thought (JET) / Revue De La Pensée Éducative, vol. 47, no. 1/2, 2014, pp. 60–70. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/24713052. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.

[6]: Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. “Mind-Set Matters: Exercise and the Placebo Effect.” Psychological Science, vol. 18, no. 2, 2007, pp. 165–171. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40064598. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.

[7]: Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. “Mind-Set Matters: Exercise and the Placebo Effect.” Psychological Science, vol. 18, no. 2, 2007, pp. 165–171. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40064598. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.

[8]: Bahl, Shalini, et al. “Mindfulness: A Long-Term Solution for Mindless Eating by College Students.” Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, vol. 32, no. 2, 2013, pp. 173–184. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/43305781. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.

[9]: Carlson, Erika N. “Overcoming the Barriers to Self-Knowledge: Mindfulness as a Path to Seeing Yourself as You Really Are.” Perspectives on Psychological Science, vol. 8, no. 2, 2013, pp. 173–186. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/44281869. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.

[10]: Bahl, Shalini, et al. “Mindfulness: Its Transformative Potential for Consumer, Societal, and Environmental Well￾Being.” Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, vol. 35, no. 2, 2016, pp. 198–210. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/44164852. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.

Copyright © 2021 Eliwise Academy. Unless Otherwise Stated